Nonproliferation, Anti-Terrorism, Demining, and Related Programs

Nonproliferation, Anti-Terrorism, Demining, and Related Programs At A Glance

Security Aid $1,090,534,000 (2017)
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The Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining and Related Programs (NADR) account supports funding  in nonproliferation, anti-terrorism, regional stability and humanitarian assistance to help reduce transnational threats to American security and mitigate local threats.

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According to the State Department, the Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining and Related Programs (NADR) account supports a broad range of U.S. national interests by funding critical, security-related programs including training, equipment, conferences, security contacts, and infrastructure. First authorized in 1996, it supports U.S. efforts in nonproliferation, anti-terrorism, border security and law-enforcement, regional stability, and humanitarian assistance while aiming to reduce transnational threats to American security and mitigate local threats. With major anti-terror and nonproliferation components, some efforts within this program focus on eliminating excess or at-risk small arms and light weapons worldwide, while others focus on humanitarian demining work to reduce civilian casualties and safely returning refugees and internally displaced persons. Demining efforts are mandated to prioritize areas where the United States is responsible for the unexploded ordnance. It also includes the International Trust Fund for Demining and Mine Victims' Assistance, a component of the humanitarian demining program that conducts and monitors mine action activities primarily in the Balkan region. Created by Congress in the mid-90s, the account seeks to give the executive branch more flexibility in administering funds for NADR-related activities. Aside from its major programs, the NADR account includes funds that support other nonproliferation activities, including the International Atomic Energy Agency and the International Monitoring System. While originally focusing on the Korean Peninsula and the former Soviet states, this authority now extends to any state deemed to be in the national security interests of the United States. The law also requests funds be spent with regular consultation and prior notification to Congress.

Program Data

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